The 4 Things Every Real Estate Agent Needs to Do For Their Own Safety
By Maggie Wilson @ Real Estate Daily
April 4, 2018

Real estate agents face many risks to their safety, and one major risk is showing houses. If agents feel like there is something wrong when they are doing a showing or an open house, they should listen to their gut feeling and avoid taking unnecessary risks.

There are 4 other things agents can do to protect themselves. 1) Agents should thoroughly screen potential buyers and they should also be familiar with the homes they are going to show. 2) Real estate salespersons should carry a flashlight during the showings which could deter potential predators. 3) Agents should have their cellphones ready to make a call if they feel like they are in danger. 4) Since many agents rush to their showings, they should make sure to drive carefully and avoid distractions so as to prevent car accidents.

Key Takeaways

  • Before taking a client on any showings, agents should require that potential buyers have and present loan pre-approval letters, since this could be a deterrent for criminals and it also weeds out people who aren’t serious about buying.
  • Carrying a flashlight with you during your showings, as well as having your phone ready to make an emergency call, shows your clients that you are prepared for something to happen.
  • Vehicle safety can also present a safety risk for real estate salespeople, so they should ensure that they are not distracted with their phones while driving.

Excerpt

In the real estate business, you want to seem friendly, outgoing, and approachable in welcoming new customers and attracting prospects. But doing so could also put your safety at risk.

The dangers that lurk within the real estate industry is a lesson some practitioners have had to learn the hard way. A study last year found a rise in violent attacks against real estate professionals, with 16 assaults and seven murders reported, according to a 2011 REALTORS® Safety Report. Real estate professionals who were meeting clients alone at showings were found to be the most vulnerable to robberies, assaults, or murders, according to the study.

Many real estate professionals can recall an incident when they’ve felt uneasy about their safety while touring homes with clients. (See ‘Safety Lessons That Saved My Life…’ or ‘How I Stay Safe’) In fact, about 42 percent of female real estate professionals and 18 percent of male agents say they’ve “occasionally” felt unsafe, according to an online survey of 450 real estate professionals conducted by Moby, a safety mobile app company.

So what’s one of your greatest allies to staying safe in real estate? Trusting your gut.

“That gut feeling is a survival instinct in our bodies,” says Adam Contos, vice president of RE/MAX who created a REALTOR® safety curriculum for the franchise’s S.A.F.E.R. program. “If we feel something is wrong, there probably is something wrong. …Don’t ignore signs just to chase a commission. A commission isn’t worth your life, nor is it worth your peace of mind in an industry where you can have great success. Don’t take unneeded risks.”

View the original article at the National Association of Realtors