Record Breaking Sale: $50 Million for 24 Acres on a Prime Malibu Beach Bluff
By Beckie Strum @ Mansion Global
July 6, 2017
A developer has paid $50 million for 24 acres on a Malibu bluff above an ultra-exclusive stretch of beach, making it the city’s biggest land deal

EXCERPT: A luxury developer has paid $50 million for 24 acres on a Malibu bluff above an ultra-exclusive stretch of beach, making it the city’s biggest land deal, according to listing records.

Scott Gillen, the founder and owner of development and design company Unvarnished, closed Thursday on the swath of prime beach bluff, which he plans to turn into a guard-gated community of five luxe, multi-million-dollar homes.

Mr. Gillen told Mansion Global he saw the land as an opportunity to build one cohesive community perched above an ultra-exclusive stretch of beachfront real estate called Malibu Colony—home at one point or another to stars like Sting, Judd Apatow, Mel Brooks and Bill Murray.

“To create an entire environment: That was the draw. And the views are spectacular,” Mr. Gillen said.

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He had a very clear vision for the enclave, which he’s dubbed “The Case,” and began designing the homes two-to-three months before the deal closed, he said. Sandro Dazzan of Coldwell Banker Global Luxury represented Mr. Gillen in the record-breaking deal.

The development will include five homes inspired by mid-century modern architecture. Mr. Gillen said he likes to draw on elements from Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic exteriors, including low-pitched roofs and big eaves. His interiors center around open floorplans with exposed post-and-beam details, he said.

“Everything that I build is south facing, so I also work a lot with the sun,” Mr. Gillen said—an appropriate source of inspiration given the dramatic bluff and ocean views.

The homes will range from 10,500 square feet for the smallest of the homes to around 13,500 for the largest, with the parcels varying from around 2.5 acres to over 5.5 acres. The developer also plans to incorporate landscaping with California’s native coastal species.

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